Sundar Pichai’s Top 10 Rules For Success (@sundarpichai)


– So you know, a big
part of what I focus on at any given time is making
sure we are innovating and building products for the future. One brilliant invention can
unleash other entrepreneurs to revolutionize industries in
ways you could never predict. We want to push the technology at times because you don’t know what’s
possible on the other side. You have to work with people where you feel a bit insecure. That’s essential, because that means you’re working with people
who are better than you. – He’s an Indian-American
business executive. He’s the current CEO of Google. He has an estimated net
worth of one billion dollars. He’s Sundar Pichai and
here’s my take on his top ten rules for success. Rule number seven is my personal favorite and I’m curious to figure out which one you guys like the best. Also as you’re watching,
if he says something that really hits you hard,
really means a lot to you, leave it in the comments
and put quotes around it so other people can be inspired as well. – From a perspective,
and I think it’s true for technology in particular, you
know the world keeps changing as I said earlier, so a
big part of what I focus on at any given time is making
sure we are innovating and building products for the future. It’s just got to be a normal
course of how you think. And so we are constantly thinking about what to do next. You know, Android is very popular, people are using smartphones,
but I always sit and think about what is
the next version of how people will use computing? So we are thinking about
things like virtual reality or augmented reality, so
these are all new areas, but we are constantly thinking about it. So you have to do that on a
constant basis to push forward. The thing which attracted me to Google and to internet in general is
that it’s a great equalizer. So to me, I’ve always been
struck by the fact that Google search worked the
same, as long as you had access to a computer with connectivity, if you were a rural kid
anywhere or if you were a professor at Stanford or Harvard. To me, I want Google to
strive to push to do that. Not just build technology
for certain segments, right? For me it matters that we drive technology as an equalizing force, as an enabler to everyone around the world. Growing up in India, like
many of you, I got my first telephone when I was 12. In my case, it turned
out to be a rotary phone, so it wasn’t that great for selfies. (audience laughs) But I still loved to call
my friends, play with it, and sometimes take it apart. That telephone cemented my
fascination with technology. I remember in my parents’
house in Chennai, reading about the invention of
the transistor at Bell Labs. Of course, that initial
invention helped found what became known as Silicon
Valley, and out of that came companies like Fairchild
Semiconductor and Intel, and all the computers and software that we all use today. You can draw a direct
line from that invention to the technology that
powers your Twitter feed or your ReChat messages today. I remember reading
about that and thinking, “It’s the idea that matters.” It didn’t matter where you come from, or what your background is. One revolutionary idea,
one brilliant invention, can unleash other entrepreneurs
to revolutionize industries in ways you could never predict. You will have many many
opportunities to reinvent yourself. So I think it’s worthwhile taking risks and trying to do something
you’re really excited by. If at the first attempt
you don’t do it, you know, you can try again and things tend to work out in the long run. In Silicon Valley, part of
the reason so many people start up a company is,
starting up a company and even having failed,
you can wear it like a badge of honor, right? I think that’s important,
culturally, risk is rewarded. I remember when I started
working at Google, if I went and people
were discussing ideas, the other people who
heard the ideas try to build on those ideas, they encourage you. So it’s a culture of optimism,
it’s a culture of risk taking and I think that’s really important. – Are there any Jedi mind
tricks that you’re employing that, you know, maybe
people aren’t seeing? That you’re doing to
motivate your employees? – You know for me, it
mainly is, I’ve always been very passionate, so I’m an optimist about how technology can make a difference. So I focus on that, and
that way you kind of tend to forget about the other things. The rest is noise in some ways. We believe that software
is at a stage where software increasingly is
playing a more and more critical role in solving
things, which it didn’t before. – Okay. – So to me when I look at cars, people spend an inordinate
amount of time in cars. These are resources which
are very poorly utilized. Right now as we speak,
you can look outside and you can see all the
cars which are parked. – Right, the car that
we rented to get here is just sitting in the parking lot. – That’s right, so they
get used less than 10%. So we see these problems, and we say okay, can we solve it at
scale, and does computing play a part in it, software
and computer science? And while the effort may
seem ambitious or crazy, we take a very disciplined
approach inside. So those are thought
through like businesses which we are building. It’s just that we are willing
to take a long term view, but we run them in a very disciplined way. Our research can be longer
term, and we do that precisely in research when
we take research projects like Google IE tab or our core research, we never know whether
some of them even makes viable business
applications, but we want to push the technology at
times, because you don’t know what’s possible on the other side. Being in the U.S., I find people take a remarkably varied number of paths. So I do think it’s important
to follow your dream and do something which you are excited by. I think if you follow your
heart and do what you like, you will always do much better. I don’t think it matters
that you’re an engineer or you’re in science, or
it can be in any field. – What is your morning routine like? What do you do when you
first get up in the morning? – Believe it or not I still,
I read a physical paper every single morning.
– Which one? – I read the Wall Street
Journal every morning. I read the New York Times online. And I still am very particular
about having my tea, it’s very English, you
know I grew up in India, so having my tea. I’m vegetarian, so I
need to get my protein so I always have an omelet in
the morning with toast, tea, and read my paper, so I
do that every morning. – What time do you wake up? – 6:30 to seven, so that’s when I do it. – Do you exercise in the morning? – No, later in the day
sometimes if I get a chance, but always in the evening. I wish I could do it in
the morning, I’m not a morning person so I need my
time with my paper and tea to wake up and kind of get going. – Now you’re being spoken
about as a potential next CEO of Google. – (laughs) I keep hearing
that, I mean Larry is very very committed to Google
for the very long term, so am I, I’m passionate about computing. Google gives a chance
for me to do what I love and do it in a way which
impacts a lot of people. So it’s a good partnership
I have with Larry and with the team there, so
I expect it to stay the same. You know I would actually
encourage all of you, if at some point in your life
you have to work with people where you feel a bit insecure. That’s essential, because
that means you’re working with people who are better than
you, and who are pushing you. So I will always encourage
you, if you actually feel very secure in what you
do, that means you’re doing something comfortable
and not pushing yourself. So there are many many times I’ve felt, working with people and a
group, am I doing enough? These people seem much better than me. I think that’s an
inherent part of learning. – Thank you guys so much for watching, I made this video because
Yash Chavan asked me to. So if there’s a famous
entrepreneur that you want me to profile next, leave it
down in the comments below and I’ll see what I can do. I’d also love to know
which of the top 10 rules had the biggest impact on you and why. Leave it in the comments, I’m
going to join in the discussion. Finally I wanted to give
a quick shout out to Jonathan Chew from chewsjoy.com, Jonathan thank you so
much for buying my book, it really means a lot to me. For those of you watching,
if you want your chance at a shout out in a
future video, make sure to pick up a copy of the book
and email in your receipt so we can keep track. Than you guys so much for watching. Continue to believe or
whatever your one word is, and I’ll see you soon.

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